• Japan's Meiji Industrial Revolution
  • Sites of Distorted Facts and Concealed Truth

Japan's Meiji Industrial Revolution

Sites of Distorted Facts and Concealed Truth

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Allied POW Charlie Wable | Taken to prison camp in Fukuoka in September 1942, forced to work at the Yahata Steel Works
The American Charlie Wable was taken to a prison camp in Fukuoka in September 1942. The camp was infested with fleas, lice and bedbugs, and sleeping properly was impossible. The death toll at the camp continued to increase due to the lack of food and medical supplies. He worked from 7 am to 6 pm, with 3 days off per month. The treatment of prisoners by the Japanese became worse after the air raids, and several prisoners were killed while working.

- 「On Forced Migrations and Labor at the Yahata Steel Works (original Japanese title: 八幡製鉄所における強制連行・強制労働について」

Allied POW E.K. Britt | Taken to prison camp in Fukuoka in January 1945, forced to work at the Yahata Steel Works
The American Britt was taken to a prison camp in Fukuoka in January 1945. About 1,200 people were divided into 12 sections in the camp. The US captain in charge asked that a red cross be painted on the roof of the camp, but the Japanese lieutenant said that it would be safer not to mark anything. Out of the 100 American prisoners of war, 24 died of dysentery, beriberi, and pneumonia.

- 「On Forced Migrations and Labor at the Yahata Steel Works (original Japanese title: 八幡製鉄所における強制連行・強制労働について」

Allied POW Donald L. Versaw | Taken to Fukuoka Futase Coal Mine in July 1944
The American Donald L. Versaw was taken prisoner in Corregidor in the Philippines, and was held in the Cabanatuan prison camp where he buried dead bodies. In July 1944, he was thrust into the hold of the vessel Nissho Maru at the Port of Manila and taken to Nippon Steel's Futase Coal Mine. Those taken there were trained like volunteer recruits and were abused by being slapped or beaten as they were forced to work. Some would break their own arms to escape from labor in the coal mine. He endured the ordeal by keeping the return to his hometown and family foremost in his mind.

- 「Japan-US POW Dialogue (original Japanese title: 捕虜 日米の対話)」

 
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